• Sharebar

advertisement

 

Knee Replacement

What To Expect After A Knee Replacement

Last updated on:
18/04/2012

Contributing Author: Guy Slowik FRCS

Immediately after surgery there may be mild discomfort due to the operation itself. Pain medication is given to lessen any pain. However, the pain rapidly subsides and the person notices that they no longer suffer from the longstanding pain of arthritis they have endured for so many years

The healing phase will last approximately three months. During this time the mobility of the knee increases, the discomfort lessens, and ultimately the knee becomes pain free.

The new joint will again be smooth and glide easily. However, even though the newer knee may feel normal, it is not as durable as that provided by nature and so should not be abused.

Precautions And Suggestions For The First 12 Weeks Following Surgery.

Advice on sitting

Advice on walking

Advice on lifting

Advice on showering

Advice on exercising

Advice on getting into a car

Advice on Sitting

  • Use a chair with arms, to assist in rising from a sit to stand position.
  • Avoid sitting for periods of time longer than one hour without getting up and walking for a brief duration. If sitting for an extended period of time is unavoidable, elevate the foot to avoid excessive swelling of the lower extremity.

Advice on walking

  • Remember: If the new knee was an uncemented type, weight bearing may need to be restricted to toe-touch only for the first six weeks.

Advice on lifting

  • Lifting should be restricted to loads of up to ten pounds only.

Advice on showering

  • Showering is recommended over bathing.

Advice on exercising

  • Do the exercises that were recommended initially after discharge from the hospital.
  • Formal supervision from a physical therapist is recommended to ensure all exercises are done properly.

Advice on getting into a car and driving

  • The first step in getting into a car should be just to simply sit at the edge of the seat, followed by pulling in the legs and then pivoting to face forward.
  • Driving is usually not recommended until after the first six weeks. In some cases, and under the recommendation of the surgeon, some patients may be able to return to driving a car sooner if it is equipped with an automatic transmission. and if good leg muscle control is present.
 
 

advertisement

 

advertisement

Take Our Quiz

Stroke is a global disease that knows no boundaries. But few people know how to prevent stroke, or how to recognize signs and symptoms of stroke, or what to do when you suspect someone is having a stroke. What about you? How much do you know about stroke? Take this short quiz to test your stroke IQ.

take the quiz>>

Rate This Article

Your rating: None Average: 3.5 (4 votes)
 

From Andrew Maynard - Chair of the University of Michigan Department of Environmental Health Sciences, with help from David Faulkner - 2013 Master of Public Health graduate.